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Thursday, June 25, 2020

Trolley Trail - Branford, Connecticut



The Branford Trolley Trail is one of those scenic quick little hikes that you probably found on the internet.  The short distance and photo-worthy bridge make this a popular trail for family and photo lovers alike.  It's this pretty little walk through the marsh that takes you to through an iconic Coastal Connecticut landscape, up and over a trolley bridge and to a picturesque little cove on the other side.  It's pretty, its kid-friendly, dog friendly, and it's a great way to stretch your legs while taking in the views.  

Pair it with a trip to the quaint little area known as Stony Creek, add in a mandatory lobster roll by the water, spend some time in the gazebo on the dock and you have yourself the best little excursion on a Summer afternoon.  

Friday, May 22, 2020

Outdoorsy Girls Guide To: HIKING ALONE



This is one of the posts I didn't actually know I needed to write.  As someone who has spent a lot of solo time on the trails, I (naively) thought this just came naturally to a lot of people.


Sure, some people may think twice about entering a trail alone in the woods for fear of getting lost or encountering wildlife as these are more in line with my hesitations when I walk onto a trail.  What I didn't know, was how many people are afraid of other people while hiking alone. I was alarmed by the amount of people asking for tips on hiking alone for this reason. 

Saturday, May 16, 2020

Outdoorsy Girls Guide to: TRAIL SIGNS

Welcome to another week in the Outdoorsy Girls Guide To: ________
(which I am now calling the OGGT)
Today, we are talking about Trail Signs

Even if you consider yourself to be a serious hiker, you can learn something new in this little post of trail sign information.  Sometimes when you are following a trail, it is a very clear path in an open area (think somewhere like the desert).  The trail you are typically following is a 4 to 6 feet wide cleared compacted surface. If it crosses a grass-covered area, you’re likely to see a bare earthen path where the trail is. Trail maintainers will sometimes leave fallen logs along the side of the trail to mark its sides and channel hikers along the intended path.  Other times, you are in a dense section of woods or on a less traveled trail and you need to rely on trail signs to stay on the path.  


So you are out on a hike on your local trails and you see a bunch of blazes on the trees.  Often, its just a single blaze marking the trail you are supposed to follow ahead (hey here's the trail, head straight).  Sometimes, you get a collection of blazes in different configurations and colors.  

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Macedonia Brook - Blue Loop - Kent, Connecticut


The first time I went to Macedonia State Park was November of 2018.  I went on a handful of dates with a lovely man from Milford who was living in New York City during the week, finishing up an orthodontics program at Columbia (let's call him "The Dentist").   The Dentist was an avid outdoorsman and if I thought I liked to ski mountain bike and hike, the dentist was on another level of outdoor recreation, telling tales of his time as ski patrol out in crested butte and winters spent skiing Japan (Japow?).  It was clear we both loved to hike and soon discovered we both loved the quiet corner of northwest Connecticut.

Friday, May 8, 2020

Outdoorsy Girl's Guide To: POISON IVY

Happy FRIDAY and welcome to my first post in the Outdoorsy Girls Guide To ______ series. 
Each week, we fill in the blank with some useful knowledge for playing and staying outside. 


Today's guide is all about identifying and educating yourself about Poison Ivy. 
This post is timely as with the presence of COVID-19, we are seeking the outdoors as an escape now more than ever.  Lately on my morning runs and afternoon hikes, I can see poison ivy popping up e v e r y w h e r e.  So today, we talk about this pesky plant that will ruin any outdoor adventure.  On the topic of contracting and identifying poison ivy, I feel like an expert. If you hike, walk or run with me and have to listen to me point out these leaves 500 times, you are welcome and I'm sorry in advance. 

Friday, May 1, 2020

Best Connecticut Hikes


COVID-19 has changed the way we live.  It has changed the way we socialize, the way we go out to eat or see our friends.  It changed the way we work, the way we learn, and even the way we play outside.  For the first time since I can remember, it seems that even the outdoors are closed.  A lot of communities around the world are closing their doors as they serve as gateways to some of our best outdoor play areas and do not have the resources to help protect a population beyond their local community.  

A part of this change has been learning to recreate closer to home.  By staying local, we are less likely to spread this virus to different parts of the country, especially to small towns with limited resources that provide access to some of our world class trail systems.  By choosing less risky outdoor activities, we are limiting the chance of emergencies and injuries that may land us in a hospital, taking up valuable resources during this pandemic.

Instead of epic road trips, camping weekends in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and backpacking trips, we shifted our focus to staying local.  We spent more time on our local trails.  I doubled my road running miles in the month of April and spent more time running my local trails right here in town.  

If you need some inspiration within the Connecticut state lines, this post is for you.  Here is a roundup of some of my favorite Connecticut hikes.  They aren't 4,000 footers, but you can find some beautiful hikes that will take you to castles, waterfalls, vistas and much more. 


Distance:  5.5-miles out and back 
Elevation:  1,273' elevation gained 
Trail heads:  Two ways to get there  - from Fall's Village or from Route 44 trailhead in Salisbury. parking at the Upper Falls Village.  You can do as a point to point with two cars, or an out and back.  The parking area from Falls Village is located at the Great Falls Recreation Area lot (41.96369, -73.37222)
Highlights:  Mount Prospect, Mount Prospect Viewpoint and Rand's View (open field/meadow/farmland and a view of the Northern Berkshires).  




Distance:  6 miles
Elevation Gain:  1,797 feet
Trail head:  Under Mountain Trail head on Under Mountain Road, Salisbury (marked with a small blue oval sign). At the junction of Route 41 and Route 44, take the left onto Route 41 and the trail head will be on your left in 3.1 miles, shortly after Deep Woods Road. 
Highlights:  A fun hike if you want to "bag a Connecticut peak" relatively easily and hike some elevation in the state.  The trail overall was nice, but a little boring at times.  It was fun to be on the famous Appalachian Trail.  The signage along the entire trail was great (large signs with distances, arrows, etc).  The trail was almost entirely shaded and typical of wooded New England trails.   The elevation will make you work and the distance is short and manageable.  The summit had a pretty view of lakes and other peaks but was very crowded.  A fun hike that allows dogs and would be even prettier in the fall with the changing leaves.  


Distance: 5.4-miles loop (1 mile of it is on the dirt road on the way back) 
Elevation Gain:  1,078'
Trail head:  The only way to access the trail head when the dirt road is closed (closed at the CT/MA border and then further into Connecticut at Riga Road  See my full post for notes on getting to the parking area and trail head
Highlights:  This one actually covers THREE states, but let's still consider this a local CT hike.  You actually hike the highest point (not summit) in CT while taking in some great views on this fun little loop. 


Dogs Paugussett State Forest Lake Zoar Zoar Trail

Distance: 6-7 miles (closer to 7) for the full loop -  Moderate to challenging in spots - it is longer with some steep and rocky sections. The trail also narrows out along the Housatonic. 
Elevation (Ascent): 1,227' 
Trail head: We parked at the Lower Paugusset Trailhead at the end of Great Quarter Road in Newtown, CT. There is a small dirt parking lot that probably fits about 12 cars. We started early and by the time we left around noon, the parking lot was full and cars were lining up along the road. There is no bathroom or map at the trailhead. 
Highlights:  Beautiful wooded trail which follows the lake in parts and takes you to "Prydsen Falls" in the Paugussett State Forest which offers a 25-foot plunge and 40-feet of cascades that empty into the Housatonic River. You can walk up to the banks of the river but there is no swimming allowed in this area. 



Distance: My favorite loop is 3 miles 
Highlights:  There are few CT places I love more than my local preserve.  It is 2 miles down the road and offers a little bit of everything:  open fields, wooded trails, wide paths by the power lines and views of the lake.  It is exceptional in the fall and you can almost always find a few dogs to socialize with on the weekends.  It's where I go to trail run, walk the fields, take photos, or just sneak away to the woods for a little while.  It is also a section of the Scenic New England Trail which traverses through Connecticut. If you want the place to yourself, try to get there before 8 am. 



Distance & Elevation:  The park is small but believe it or not you can still get in a great 4.5 mile loop hike with over 800 feet of elevation. The Orange route is the largest individual trail and the more challenging hike throughout the main section of the forest leading up to the vista.  For a shorter hike just to see the vista, Foxtown Road leads to a small (unofficial) parking area that cuts to a back entrance to the vista. * The Blue loop also offers a shorter and easier alternative to the Orange trail. Of the trails on the opposite side of the park (across the entrance road). The Green trail is extremely rocky, steep, and not well blazed; while the Yellow is somewhat confusing at times and not as well marked as the other trails. More Info/Source
Trail head: Devil's Hopyard State Park   366 Hopyard Road  East Haddam, CT 06423
Highlights:  Waterfall, river, covered bridges, vistas, beautiful wooded trail through a state park




Distance: Shorter/blue option, 1-mile to 1.25-miles round trip, Longer, less steep option 2-miles 

Parking/ Trail head:  There is a lot at the Bluff Head trail head on Rt. 77 about 1/2 mi. north of Great Hill Rd (it should come up on Google Maps).  Once you get off the highway (I-95), follow Route 77 for approximately  8.6 miles where you will see a blue sign and a parking area on your left.  There are no bathrooms at the trailhead.
Highlights:  The trail is part of the Mattabesset hiking trail, a 60-mile trail traveling through the towns of Guilford, Durham, Madison, Haddam, Middletown, North Branford, Wallingford, Middlefield, Meriden and Berlin,  The Matabesset hiking trail is part of the 215 mile New England Scenic Trail (which goes from Long Island Sound in Guilford to the MA/NH border).  A short STEEP hike takes you to a viewpoint of the reservoir and North Guilford farmlands.




Distance:  5.5-miles
Elevation Gain: about 930 feet
Parking Area/Trail head:  Off West Lane - plug 437 West Ln, Berlin, CT 06037 into Google Maps.  There is no formal parking lot but instead, a few spaces at the trailhead and hikers park along the right side of West Lane.
Highlights:  Sweeping views of the reservoir, nice loop in a scenic wooded preserve.  Get there early as the trail gets busy quick.  




Distance:  4.3 miles
Elevation:  1,000+' of elevation
Somehow I ended up following a different trail description for "East Peak/Castle Craig" on the park brochure.  While the brochure advertised 4.3 miles and 1,000', our hike clocked in at 500' and 3.5 miles.  We may have missed a section or turned back to soon but either way, it was fun exploring a new part of Connecticut and forcing myself to leave the cozy nest of the shoreline.  
Highlights:  A hike with 1,000' of elevation gain right in the middle of Connecticut, You can get in a quick blood pumping hike to Castle Craig among the Hanging Hills of Connecticut.   The castle and the hike are in Hubbard Park which is on the National Register of Historic Places.  Vista's, castle, and elevation on a dog-friendly hike. 



Distance:  2.5 miles out and back 
Elevation:  approx. 400' 
Easy to moderate.  Generally family friendly, nice and short.  Little steep sections up rocky areas may be difficult for small children, which can also be very slippery after a rainstorm.
Trail head:  Wintechog Hill Road -- Take I-95 to Exit 92. Follow Route 2 west. Turn left on Wintechog Hill Road just before reaching Foxwoods Resort Casino. The parking area and trail entrance is on the right.
Highlights:  Short hike with vistas of the reservoir - gorgeous in the fall.  There are some cliffy sections and some great overlooks as you follow the trail to the main overlook.  A lot of the trail is over rock which can get very slippery between rain storms and leaves on the ground.  


Distance: The main loop around the park is a 4-mile wide old dirt road. There are various smaller trails branching off from the main dirt road.
Parking/Trail head:  Take a left at the first light onto Depot Road. Park entrance is at the end of the road and the trail starts from the parking lot. 
Highlights:  Wide easy to follow jeep trail with water views.  You can stop at the beach and there is a nice picnic area/kayak launch by the parking lot. 


Distance: There is a main 3-mile loop hike with plenty of side trails throughout.  
Trail head: The end of Palmer Neck Road in Stonington, Connecticut.  Keep your eye out for the "castle" on your way to Barn Island.  There are parking spaces for a few cars at the entrance to main loop trail; there is also a large paved parking lot at the boat launch.
Highlights:  Barn Island is a 1,000+ acre preserve in Stonington, Connecticut.  Barn Island has been called the "Wild Coast of Connecticut" and the beauty of this preserve lies in its lack of development. Enjoy trails from wooded paths to open fields and enjoy water views while you walk the preserve. 


Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Sleigh Rides on the National Elk Refuge - Jackson, Wyoming



The elk of Jackson are an important part of the culture and history of this area.  You can see their presence hanging in art galleries throughout the downtown area, at the entrance of the square as you walk through the antler arches, and at the preserve itself where winter sleigh rides are advertised. 

We were determined to push through the chaos and for our last day in Wyoming and so, we booked a sleigh ride through the Elk Preserve before heading back to Salt Lake City.  I did this my first time in Wyoming and loved seeing the elk up close while being pulled in a horse-drawn sleigh all while learning about the elk's history in Jackson and how the refuge operates.  

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

Day 5 & 6 - Grand Teton National Park and Jackson Hole, Wyoming

I remember the first time I got off the plane and wandered around the state of Wyoming almost 10 years ago.  I'm not sure how else to describe that first week I spent in Wyoming but I know I was smitten.  It was my first time out west and I was fully thrown into this land of cowboys and ski bums. It was love at first sight, I was convinced Wyoming was the place for me.  



I went to Yellowstone National Park and we rented snowmobiles to see sleepy bison and Old Faithful with a fresh snowfall.  I got my first taste of powder as we skied this famously hard mountain and ate sushi at the top on a perfect sunny day.  I saw my first moose and bald eagle in Grand Teton National Park.  I watched a service for a ski patrol member and watched the culture of this ski town come to life as everyone paid their respects with a flask of whisky in Teton Village.   I drank cold beer at the Mangy Moose and I fell in love with this part of the country so far from home.  I chatted with the taxi driver on how I could feasibly move myself (and my horse) out here.  Turns out I never made it to Wyoming but believe me when I say I was in love. 

Monday, April 13, 2020

Utah - Day 4 - Snowbird, Pretty Bird Chicken and Normal Ice Cream

It's been almost a month since I posted here, and nearly 3 months since the trip I am posting about.  Let me catch you up quick.  First off, we spent February packing up Adam's house and moving it into mine.  By the end of February, he had closed on his house and we were off to Disney World for five days.  As we prepped for Disney, the Coronavirus was just becoming a real thing.  It was new and far away still and we went to Disney loaded with hand sanitizer more for the norovirus and flu than anything else.  We got back from Disney and adjusted to life in my 1,000 SF into the month of March.

Sunday, March 22, 2020

COVID-19 - notes from home

I have been avoiding the news, getting my updates via 15 minutes on NPR's podcast "Up First" or on the WHO website. I guess what I am trying to say is this post is not meant to alarm or overwhelm, it's not meant to start fear or increase panic.  It's just my thoughts, it's the details of the last few weeks before they slip from my memory. 

I was listening to the news one day in the car when the voice in the radio said something that really grabbed a hold of me.  I wish I remembered the station (probably NPR) but the person doing the interview wanted us to stop and really document life as we knew it at this point in time. 

What's going on right now.... this is new.  It's something we have never experienced and it's going to shape the world and the way we live in it.  And you?  You should be documenting it.  You should be sharing these feelings, jotting down life through these challenging times, you should be remembering these feelings and those tiny details.  You should do it all with pen and paper if you can.  And so, as someone who enjoys writing, I saw the beauty in that, in capturing the detail in the days and well, here we are. 

It's Sunday night, March 22nd and here's my recap of how we got here. 

Let me catch you up quickly.  November 17 was the first confirmed case of the coronavirus (COVID-19) and January 20th was the first confirmed case here in the United States.  As we prepped for Disney at the end of January, the Coronavirus was just becoming a distant fear in Connecticut and we were conscious in Disneyworld while still making a plethora of bad coronavirus jokes.  We went to Disney loaded with hand sanitizer more for the norovirus and flu and common cold than anything else.  We got back from Disney and adjusted to life in my 1,000 SF house, sinking into the new month of March.  While we were traveling and going through the normal steps of life, the death toll was rising in China and we swirled into a mixture of dismissing China and mild panic.

The first step felt like it came from the colleges.  With the dire situation in China, colleges were quickly bringing back students who were studying abroad.  At about this time, hand sanitizer and wipes were flying off the shelf and it was instantly impossible to get your hands on those kinds of cleaning projects.   DIY hand sanitizers were the new Pinterest share and people were bringing it back from wherever they were traveling.  The new Instagram story was someone with a bottle of Lysol, packing it away into their suitcase to bring back home.

By early March, we decided to start looking at houses and get mine ready to put on the market.  The coronavirus in the States was real and we heard reports of outbreaks in towns and fear in the cities.  It wasn't close to home yet but it was here and it was coming.  By the second week of March, the Coronavirus was full-blown in the United States and it was the start of all the cancelations.

State colleges posted their cancellations and the news reported that colleges were going to be on-line only until at least the end of spring break.  We gasped, how crazy that these kids would be off for a month!  How lucky they were to have school canceled!  Students moved out of their dorms and spring breakers fled to Florida, business as usual.

Soon after the NBA canceled their season and the NCAA March Madness was canceled. Some Sporting events and political debates that were allowed to run were held without an audience.  Soon after, it was the elementary schools in the towns and cities where outbreaks had occurred.  Kids were going home and gearing up to finish the next month vis distance learning. 

With the kids home, tension was rising and so was the panic throughout some communities.  The grocery stores were being wiped clean and certain aisles were completely empty.  Newsreporters and social media showed the photos of empty shelves and grocery lines.  TP and paper towels were long gone and meat, pasta, rice and beans were also disappearing off the shelves faster than staff could stock them.

The next set of cancellations followed the NBA cancellations and covered all the larger events.  Adam's birthday Adam Sandler event was canceled and around the globe singers canceled their tours and large events were shut down.  Parades were called off and the cities were starting to really feel the heat.  New Yorkers were posting videos on the proper way to wash your hands.  Bloggers started washing their hands to songs and I learned a few new and improved habits (under nail scrub on your palms included).

Some aspects of life resumed as normal and parents were starting to panic as they tried to juggle home school and child care with their jobs.  Soon, all schools in Connecticut and virtually nationwide had closed down for the month and likely the rest of the school year.  Words like PANDEMIC and DISEASE were wildfire in everyone's mouth.  Weddings were being canceled, high school seniors starting to realize they may never see their graduation, we started to lose the privilege of spending time with the people we love.

While all this was going on, we tried to stick to our plan and our timeline as selling this house was already set in motion.   We started looking at houses and showings were getting canceled because of the virus.  At the houses we could see, we were greeted by realtors in gloves and wipes and asked not to touch anything, she would open any doors.  I walked around with my hands in my pockets, conscious of my now threatening presence in this stranger's home.

And then came the small events, study groups for my LEP exam, book club, doctor appointments and so on.  The toilet paper hoarding started and people were in full panic mode, hoarding supplies and masks and stocking up on essentials.

Restaurants started to feel the pressure and started using paper plates and utensils and sanitizing on a consistent basis.  I remember sitting at Buffalina Friday the 13th.  The tension in the air was thick and yes, you could cut it with a knife.  People were starting to be fearful and people were picking up to-go orders while delivering the local news.  I was conscious yet still so unsure.  I remember using a napkin to grab the pepper shaker and washed my hands before and after leaving the restaurant.

Individuals started to self-quarantine, even before orders came down from the State.  We started to take advantage of our time home and everyone started cleaning out their junk drawers and organizing their pantry.  We all became expert bakers and went to food for comfort.  Quarantine15 became the new joke as we ate our feelings while we watched the news.

I work for an environmental consulting firm and some of our drilling work was being canceled because the warehouses we were working in were closed or on lockdown.  COVID-19 disclaimers started to make their way into contracts and safety plans and we had to sign off that we had not been to a foreign country and did not have a fever.  COVID-19 was the message on large electronic boards on the highway, letting you know where to find information.

By St. Patricks Day restaurants and bars were mandated to close, with takeout service only.  We naively started to worry that our beloved gyms may close, completely ignorant to just how dire things were about to be.  I went to the town hall to get a permit for some home renovations and was shuttled into a separate room to fill out paperwork in isolation.  There was a physical barricade at the town hall, keeping visitors at least six feet away.  I left with this eerie sense of isolation while a voice from around the corner said they would call me to tell me just how much I owed.

The medical supply shortage also felt instant.  Nurses were working around the clocks and reusing masks and begging for donations.  The news stories started reporting on the lack of ventilators.  The medical staff begged us all to please, stay home.

Movie theaters, gyms and nail salons were ordered to close.  Small business' shut their doors and the financial hit was instant.  The stock market was closed by default just minutes after opening by circuit breaker as a self-check mechanism.  By the time Adam's birthday rolled around on Friday, March 20, we - were - in - it.  Italy's death rates were skyrocketing and we saw the coffins lined up in the news.  People were in day 7 of quarantine here in the U.S. while doctors in Italy decided who lives and who dies.  We started to see the pattern, fearing we were following Italy's footsteps, just a little bit delayed.

Social Distancing was the new catchphrase and the awkwardness of isolation hit us.  We walked around with the six-foot gap, awkward and nervous, walking around as if everyone is a walking talking source of COVID-19.  Countries around the world were closing their cities and sheltering in place.  It felt like the whole world was falling down together and no one was immune.  From Australia to my hometown in Connecticut, we were all starting to feel the severity of the situation. People were posting creative ways to entertain their kids and all the dogs were loving all this time spent home with their owners. We were getting creative with our online workouts and sharing our tears and our struggles on social media outlets.

People started posting about webcam happy hours.  We starting seeing photos of a few friends sharing a meal outside while all sitting at least six feet apart.  Instead of a birthday party for Adam, we had a four-person dinner to celebrate Adam's 37th trip around the sun.  I remember driving to my sister's feeling guilty.  It was just the four of us but we were breaking social distancing code and I was uneasy as we packed up dinner and headed there.  We had a lovely night, the perfect distraction from the chaos and driving home at 11 at night on a Friday,  we were in shock of the ghost town that was all around us.

By the time Saturday morning hit, nearly every store that remained open had a 6-foot mark with tape at the register or anywhere a line would form.  Drive-up testing was just starting to hit in my area and people started to call their doctors nervous with symptoms. The governor issued a mandatory closure for nonessential business per Monday night at 8 pm and everything started to close.  Grocery stores were to remain open and there were special hours for the 60 and over age group to ensure they were away from the crowds and able to get supplies.

Local barns were closing and sit started to feel like the year was just being cancelled.  People were flocking to the outdoors and we had to start closing down certain parks, begging people to avoid busy sections of trail.  The Appalachian Trail begged hikers to postpone their thru-hikes and we started to feel unsafe even in the outdoors, following the new advice of "groups of 10 or less".  The neighborhood was full of walkers, people trying to escape the madness of their house and week-long quarantine.  We watched cities like Barcelona with strict lockdowns and empty streets, thankful for our freedom to fresh air.  We watched the statistics of a life in isolation, cleaner air and cities, tanking economies and unemployment skyrocketing.  The day felt like an actual week and we all started to question a cough, take a regular temperature.... we started to panic over a sniffle.  We all agreed the world was such a strange and scary place, that these were "crazy times".  We ended our phone calls and emails with "be well" and in just a few weeks, life as we knew it had taken a sharp turn.  As we went to bed Sunday night we feared what the news was telling us, the worst was yet to come. 

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Utah Day 3 - Deer Valley and Park City, Utah


If you want a ski vacation with variety and easy access,
Utah delivers. 

This western state is so special because of it's easy access to so many different ski mountains.  You get to the airport and in less than an hour, you can be on the lift at one of Utah's ten resorts.  These ten resorts all have their different culture - a different flavor for different skiers or different moods for different days.   

So you just got off the plane in Salt Lake City, you grabbed your ski bags and your rental car and you are trying to figure out where to go.  


If you want that old school "simple is best" vibe on a world-class mountain, head to Alta.  If you want more of a local mountain with a lower-priced lift ticket and a night skiing option, Brighton is for you. If you want the open bowls of Mineral Basin and to ride the tram, head to Snowbird.  If you want fewer crowds and what I call the best run in Utah (Honeycomb Canyon) head to Solitude.  

Thursday, February 6, 2020

Utah Day 2 - Skiing Alta


There's something special about Alta that is often hard to describe to those who have not skied her slopes. That something special goes a little like this.

Alta is untouched by the fussiness of skiing. Alta is simply all about skiing. The mountain is the priority and everything else is sort of some standard-essential.  In an age where we are starting to realize less is more, there's something simply perfect about this "focus on the skiing" philosophy.  

Monday, February 3, 2020

Antelope Island State Park - Utah Day 1

antelope island

Somewhere along the way, I started ditching the typical warm-weather winter getaway.  

Instead of heading out on dive trips to the Carribean or sneaking south to soak up some sun, I started doing the exact opposite.  I started booking trips during the winter here to go somewhere with well, more winter.  Useful winter if you ask me.  

Because one thing you need to know is this: winter in Connecticut is not useful.  No mountains to ski or snow to play in.  Just some often bitter cold wet windy weather that makes playing outsider harder, not better.  So instead of heading south to the warmth, I started heading northwest towards the copious amount of white fluffy powder.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Livs Shack - CT Lobster Shack Tour



Well, it's my first post of 2020 and I have been a little MIA in the way of social media.  

Why?  It's painfully simple - I've been living my life.  Like spending time with family, friends, Adam, our dogs, and my horse.  I've been working on the house and planning some big events for 2020.  It's been less on the adventure/travel parts of life, and more of enjoying the moments, getting things done around the house, and not worrying about blogging or life between the squares.  

That gap between the holidays is closing and I am back to planning adventures.  I am heading to Utah and Wyoming next week to ski and in the meantime, I'm working on old posts that never quite made it into 2019.  

This lobster shack review? It's a summer treat that is making it's way to Katie Wanders in the dead of winter.  No, the lobster shack isn't open right now but yes, I am beyond excited to talk about shellfish and buttery rolls even if January is bitter cold and the idea of eating outside is a distant memory.